bullfights-eric-bourdon-440

[ drawing in English ] [ dessin en français ] [ dibujo en español ]

 

“On the road to holidays… and bullfights”
 
(Spanish-style bullfights = corridas de toros)
Pen and marker on paper, 2017
© Eric Bourdon

 

     This drawing was inspired by the contrast between the awareness campaigns against the abandonment of pets on the roads to holidays, carried out by the animal welfare associations, and the festive torture of other animals, supported by the law and mostly funded by public money.

     Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. While empathy is stimulated on one side, it is reduced to nothingness on the other. Even more, one encourages not only to stay passive, but also to take a positive pleasure in the spectacle of another’s suffering.

– – – Read more – – –

nazi philosopher martin heidegger nazism

(Zoom on the drawing)

 

Read Heidegger with no reference to Nazism ?

Pen and marker drawing on paper,
with digital retouching
by Eric Bourdon © 2016

– – – Read more – – –

Celtic art and monsters coming to UK…

Published on 2015-07-21 by Eric Bourdon | Comment
Category(ies) : Analysis, Exhibitions


Don’t panic, they’re not really ‘Celtic’ !…

Silver Gundestrup cauldron Denmark

 

Silver Gundestrup cauldron from northern Denmark
© John Lee / The National Museum of Denmark

 

Source : From monsters to manga : golden age of art by the Celtic race that never was, by Maev Kennedy, 10 July 2015

 

Julia Farley, the London curator, said the museums hoped to explode the view that the Celts were a distinct race who kept moving west from eastern Europe until they ended up stranded to this day in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

 

– – – Read more – – –

Western collections of Assyrian art more valuable than ever…

thanks to ISIS !…

 

Source : British Museum could send loans worth £1bn to the Gulf
An article by Martin Bailey, previously published
on theartnewspaper.com (15 July 2015)

The Banquet Scene

 

The Banquet Scene
Gypsum wall panel relief fragment, 645BC-635BC
© The Trustees of the British Museum

 

Islamic State destroyed 50 complete panels at Nimrud in northern Iraq in April, which has made the remaining reliefs in museums, including the Louvre [Paris] and Metropolitan Museum of Art [New York], even more important. Although the £100m valuation may seem high for the British Museum’s Banquet Scene, Sotheby’s sold the Guennol Lioness (3000–2800BC) for $57m in 2007. The limestone figure of a lioness, believed to have been discovered near Baghdad, measures just 8cm in height. […]

– – – Read more – – –

Athens’ ruins could reveal true art…

Published on 2015-07-13 by Eric Bourdon | Comment
Category(ies) : Analysis


In Athens, the ruins of the State and market could reveal true art…

George Vamvakidis and Stathis Panagoulis of The Breeder Athens
 

George Vamvakidis and Stathis Panagoulis of The Breeder, Athens.
Photo : via artnet.com

 

“The art market is basically dead right now in Athens”, said George Vamvakidis in a telephone interview. Vamvakidis is a co-founder of The Breeder, a successful gallery that specialized in Greek contemporary artists and is known on the international art fair circuit. “The state is unable to fund the arts and the private collectors, the biggest ones, choose not to support the local market. So as a result almost every single commercial gallery of our generation has closed its doors. […]”

– – – Read more – – –

where to start 
     “No one is a prophet in their own land” is a well known popular expression. As an artist struggling to exhibit your work, you could also think “No one is an artist in their own land”. Alan Bamberger defends an opposite – or maybe complementary – view :

 

Many artists believe that all they have to do to get known is to show their art in major national or international art centers, and somehow some way, collectors will discover and appreciate it immediately. Continuing with this magical thinking, they fantasize that the exposure will result in instant recognition, a steady stream of sales, and the beginning of a great career. Why do they think this? It’s kind of a “grass is greener on the other side” mindset, often having to do with the mistaken belief that their art is not in front of the “right audience”, and that the only reason they haven’t been selling is that there’s not much of an art scene in their hometowns or wherever they happen to live, and that hardly anybody who lives there buys art. But the truth is that people do buy art, they buy it everywhere, and the hometown does count, so let’s take a look at the reality of the matter.

 

Full article here :

Artists : How to Get Shows at Galleries in Major World Art Centers

 
«